Execution is the Game

As writers, and creators, it’s easy to let perfectionism and the fear of people’s opinions (FOPO) get in the way of putting our work in the world.

I’m guilty of this. And, I’m sure you are too.

In February 2018, I had the pleasure of seeing Gary Vaynerchuck live at the Tampa Theatre. His live talk was identical to seeing him on social media — except you get to see how funny, candid, and generous he really is.

I can’t remember the first time I listened to Gary Vee, but I will say I was put off. I gave him a second chance and listened to what he was saying. Basically, his desire is for all of us to stop complaining about our lives and go all into whatever it is that we’re passionate about. He wants to help us all avoid regret at the end of our lives. I dig it.

That leads me to a Gary Vee quote that rings in my ears these days:

“Ideas are shit, execution is the game.”

And, so I find myself being more honest with myself. Writing more. Putting work in the world. Trying. Failing. Trying again.

Because ideas come and go, but the most important is to execute on what’s bursting to come out.

 

Where is home?

I’ve spent years looking for the place my soul calls home. I know I’m not the only one. I’ve had many a conversations about this with my friends who love to travel.

I assume my personal restlessness comes from the fact that I’m a child of immigrants. The area which most of my maternal side of the family in Venezuela resides is arid and desert-like, so it’s no surprise then that New Mexico struck a massive chord within me. It reminded me of my childhood at my grandmother’s house playing with my cousins in the desert, and making clay from mixing water with dirt.

Even though it was my first time visiting, I felt a deep feeling of warmth and familiarity in New Mexico. The people and culture reflect care about entrepreneurship, food, art, nature, and spirituality.

This trip showed me that home entails more than just people and place, it encompasses values and nostalgia.

New Mexico:

Venezuela:

What about you?   Where do you call home?

 

Journaling Prompts for When You’re Feeling Lost or Stuck

Hands down my daily journaling ritual has changed my life. It’s given me a much clearer perspective on my internal world and what impact I want to leave in the world around me. I’m now a journaling evangelist (is this a thing?) but really, I recommend journaling to everyone.

Today, I’m sharing some prompts which I know will give you more clarity and will shine a light on your path. If you try these, or journaling, out send me a message. Love connecting with ya’ll.

Happy Journaling!

What do I enjoy when I am not judging myself?

If I could ask the Universe something, what would I ask for?

What do I feel is trying to emerge in my life?

What do I most crave right now? 

What have I been day dreaming about lately?

What would you want if nobody cared or judged me?

What would I love to have more of in my life?

If I could leave my reputation and anything else behind, what would I do, and how would that change things for me?

Think of your 87 year old-self, what would they say to you today? What would make them feel like you lived a full life?

If there were no limits, what would I love to become involved in?

How am I holding myself back and what small action can I take today?

What can I do more of in my life that I have been missing?

Who do I admire and why do I admire them?

Where would I love to see myself in 3 years time? (describe your ideal day i.e. where you live, what you’re doing, what lights you up, who you’re with, etc.)

 

START WHERE YOU’RE AT

It’s so easy to see how far you are from your goals and dreams.

I remember when I started running. The thoughts and ideas I had of running came from High School gym class. Having to run a mile in under 12 minutes? or was it 14? I can’t remember that nightmare. All I remember was being sweaty, not being able to shower and then heading to English class. #horrible

So, as you can imagine, as an adult considering the possibility of becoming a runner gave me some really gnarly flashbacks. Instead of punishing myself for my inabilities as a teen, I opted for creating a morning ritual where I walked for 15 minutes. Those walks then became jogs, which later became runs.

There was no overnight success.

There was no pressure.

It was just me going outside, moving my legs. Everyday.

About 6 months into this routine, I ran my first half marathon.

Here’s the thing though. It never really matters how far or close you are from your goals (hear me out). What matters is that you are actually enjoying your life in the process. That you feel like WHAT you are doing and WHO you are being are in alignment.

There’s a process I use almost on a daily basis to pop me back into alignment.

  1. ask yourself WHAT you want and WHY you want it (journal about this)
  2. start where you’re at (any action towards what you want is a million times better than NO action)
  3. ask yourself WHO this goal is allowing you to become (the true win of our goals is who we become in the process)
  4. repeat steps 1-3 every day

Lastly, I just want to say this. It’s SO easy to get caught up in comparisonitis. Remember that your path is yours alone. Your business and your art is your gift to the world.  Keep taking one step every day. That’s all it takes.

And as for me? I am currently training for a full 26.2 mile marathon. One step at a time.

Inner Peace in a Busy World

I always had this idea that I should be better than I am.  I think a lot of us have these thoughts. We say to ourselves: “I should focus more. If should live up to my potential. I should be more like that other person.”

These were the thoughts that buzzed through my head on my commute to Harvard in the Fall of 2015. I was a Masters student at Brown University and an exchange scholar at Harvard. I’d commute twice a week from Providence to Boston. The commute would last about an hour. I’d leave my house around 9 am and return about 9pm.

A couple of weeks into this routine, I noticed my brain became extra busy. Like really busy. With assignments from 5 classes piling up. My internship. My job on campus. I felt scattered.

I judged myself because there were people on the train who’d been doing this commute 5 days a week for over 15 years. To me, the thought of commuting like this for even a week exhausted me.

So…. what did I do about it?

I started experimenting.

I got some earplugs. I’d put them in and I’d sit in the subway people watching, wondering what their lives were like analyzing their facial expressions. It seemed like they were happier than I was. They seemed to be at peace.

I thought the earplugs would afford me peace and quiet, but my thoughts got louder and more chaotic. I felt trapped in my head. Truthfully, I never fully realized how trapped in my thoughts I really was.

I was hard on myself for feeling this way. Why couldn’t I just sit in this train and enjoy the ride? Why couldn’t I just enjoy the journey??

It seemed like a deeper metaphor for life.

“Enjoy the journey.”

Late one night while surfing the internet looking for solutions … I discovered meditation.

Like a lot of us, I’d heard of meditation, rolled my eyes at it, and was unwilling to give it a shot. I didn’t think I was one of those people who could do it. I really thought I had a busier mind than most, and that meditation couldn’t help me.

But, I was desperate, so I gave it a shot.

One of the meditations I started with were mantra meditations I learned from Gabby Bernstein. These are meditations you do while repeating a phrase in your mind.

The one I started with was, “peace, begins, with, me”, “peace, begins, with, me.”

After trying it out for a few minutes, I instantly noticed my mind became more calm and at ease. I wondered, “whoa. Is this working?”

Meanwhile on my commutes to Boston, when I noticed my anxious thoughts take over and my fears begin to creep in I would do this meditation both with my eyes open and closed.

“Peace, begins, with, me… peace, begins, with, me.”

A couple weeks into this practice, I felt more at ease. I felt like I could control my anxiety, which otherwise seemed to creep up out of nowhere. Like the boogyman waiting to scare me.

After doing this practice on my commute, I decided to begin waking up earlier and meditating in the morning while I was still at home. What I noticed was that I felt better even before I got to the train station.

….

Here’s what I learned from my commutes to and from Harvard:

Feeling grounded doesn’t come from being in a specific place, with specific people, or doing anything in particular.

Feeling grounded comes from a deeper sense of knowing that you are safe, and at peace wherever you may find yourself.

My scattered thoughts were there before I commuted. I simply projected my anxiety and fears onto my experience on that train.

I encourage you to observe your world and see where you are projecting chaos.

I encourage to forgive yourself for not being present, for not being focused.

I ask you… can you feel rooted and at peace regardless of what is happening around you?

 

 

 

*my commute to Harvard on video.*